Wednesday, July 1, 2009

The Laundry as the Ecstacy

Lunch is done.

Time to hang the laundry.



It's deeply pleasing
To pin wet clothes on a line—
Sun, wind, dance, and song.

11 comments:

Dan Gurney said...

If you have 7 minutes to see an inspiring video, click over to Barry's blog, Scarborough Guildwood GPO blog and see the post Fr. Thomas Berry.

Delwyn said...

Hello Dan
we Australaians and NZers have always hung our washing out to dry... My daughter sent me a great little fold out hanging frame from Japam, that holds all the smaller items...my deck often looks like the proverbial chinese laundry...
but I don't care...
I like the new header photo and subtitle...

Happy days

Dan Gurney said...

Delwyn, I think you guys down under are ahead of us here in EmpireCentral in many ways. Hanging laundry outside in the US is vaguely suspicious, as if we're secret socialists or something...perhaps not adequately supportive of our illustrious oil and gas companies.

I was just about to change the header photo again. I'm glad you like the current one; it's our Laguna which I see regularly on my walks.

Hobble happily!

Sarah Lulu said...

Hello I'm Sarah and I'm a washaholic. I love it. I also love my washing line, I use it daily.

AND that photo in your header is SO lovely.

Margaret Pangert said...

Dan, it struck me that your deck looks pretty much like my deck (sans the laundry)--so do look me up; two posts ago I have that my deck with the cat on the picnic table: www.margaretpanpipes.blogspot.com. Too humid to hang wash out to dry, but I love the way everything smells when it's dry.

Dan Gurney said...

Hi, Margaret,

Yes, your deck looks like mine...mine is the favorite hangout for my cat, Rosie. Too humid? Where do you live?

Margaret Pangert said...

Hi, Dan ! I'm so sorry! I keep nagging you about listing your ten honest traits, and here you did it a week ago. I must have been distracted by the beautiful clean laundry against a blue sky. Yes, they pretty much fit the way I see you in your blog. You're not judgmental and at times you hold your peace and say little or nothing. So, bravo, for stepping up to the plate!
I live in New Jersey (northern, across the Hudson from New York but further west than that, in Upper Saddle River) and it's humid here pretty much around the clock in the warmer seasons; however, this summer it's been cooler and rainier. So you never can win! Your header looks like the area I was born and raised in. (Remember Cottonwood?) You see wheat & oat fields all the way to the Oregon border just about. Have a good holiday, but then you're on vacation, anyway!

Alden Smith (Nick name - Pal) said...

Yes simple work can be deeply pleasing, an estatic experience? hmmm have to think about that one :-)

Dan Gurney said...

Hi Alden,

Yes, I believe that when we can slow down enough that *any* activity can become luminous. I have experienced this most clearly on long meditation retreats when the world can transform and become more and more beautiful, interesting, mysterious, and ultimately mystical.

Then, the retreat ends and, back to the drawing board.

Alden Smith (Nick name - Pal) said...

..... and so I guess the corollary of that is that if you can bring what you have learnt and practised on retreat into every day life in terms of mindfulness practise, then the everyday ordinary world is somehow transformed and allows its truth to be seen, that is the transcendent in what we call ordinary.

Dan Gurney said...

Yes, exactly! At the end of retreats, there's always that talk about readjusting the ordinary world. For me, it can be difficult for a few days to adjust back to speedy meanness that we accustom ourselves to.