Wednesday, August 12, 2009

Native American Flute

It's a good idea for teachers to be actively engaged as learners.

Learning something new keeps me connected, vulnerable, on the edge—

So before the summer ends I choose something brand new to bring into my teaching practice. I want my students to see people produce music, not just consume it. That's a good lesson generally for us Americans.

This year I decided to learn to play the Native American Flute after I heard Stan Goldberg play at a book signing a couple of weeks ago. Stan plays for the dying as part of his hospice volunteer work. I want to play for the kids in kindergarten.

I surfed online, ordered one, and it came in the mail the other day. After a short time, here's how I sound...and I think it's good enough. If you've got 30 seconds, you can listen in here:

11 comments:

Sarah Lulu said...

Especially beautiful with the water backing track!

steven said...

hi dan, i think that sometimes the instrument finds the person, just because music so wishes to be heard. my dad learned to play the shakuhachi in the last two years of his life. this is a man who to the best of my knowledge never played any instrument other than a church organ when he was in his own dad's churches and that would've been something he got in trouble for!!! this is a lovely piece of music dan. thanks for those brief few seconds. the children will love this gift. steven

Alden Smith said...

Not bad Dan after only an hours practise. As a Flute player myself (I played with our local orchestra for a decade or so) I was very interested to hear this instrument. It certainly has a nice sound. When I think of a Flute I think of the 'traverse' Flute, where you hold the instrument to the side and blow across the mouthpiece, I am more inclined to think of your instument as a variation on a Baroque descant recorder.
Keep up the practise and in 12 months or so, maybe you can present us with a personally written sonata complete with incredible cadenzas!!!

Dan Gurney said...

Hi, Sarah Lulu–

Water: the original musician.

Dan Gurney said...

Hi, Steven, thank you. I enjoy playing many different instruments. As a kindergarten teacher I want to show the kids that playing music is just that: PLAYING music. I don't expect to master any instrument (I play guitar more than others and am pretty good at it). The kids see me play more than a dozen insturments: among them are guitar, ukulele, banjo, keyboard, recorder, harmonica, autoharp, accordion, djembe, cajon, conga, bongo, and an assortment of classroom instruments.

The main thing is to do it.

Dan Gurney said...

Alden, yes. It is more like a hole-challenged recorder than a flute. I didn't name it; that's what everyone calls these things. Very easy to play; you're supposed to stay within a pentatonic scale so it all sounds good.

I don't think I'll ever reach compose for the instrument. It seems to be the epitome of a folk instrument: you play from the heart.

jinksy said...

Sadly, there was no sound for me - not sure why. May try again, as Blogger tends to have off days! I have a CD of bamboo flute music, so at least I could imagine...

Katherine said...

A lovely woody. mellow tone. I bought a penny flute (tin whistle) the other day... I concur about playing from the heart. I think we both sound very good!

Paul said...

Enjoyed reading through the blog and watching your video. I've been playing NAF for a bit over two years now and don't know how I ever got along without its calming, meditative effects. Look forward to seeing more.

jinksy said...

Patience is a virtue - today, the flute played beautifully. It reminded me of a woodland full of birdsong... Thank you!

Dan Gurney said...

jinksy, thank you for trying again! I appreciate your compliment.