Wednesday, January 20, 2010

Rictameter (a poetic form new to me): To Walter, with Love

On Wikipedia I ran across a new form of poetry called a Rictameter, a 9 line syllabic form of poetry. The syllable count in a rictameter goes 2-4-6-8-10-8-6-4-2. Rictameter is a bit more spacious than a Tanka and a lot roomier than Haiku, but still pretty brief. 

As readers of this blog might guess, I'm always trying to stay with (and love) what is. So, naturally, it is to that topic that I turned to fill the Rictameter jar.

To Walter, with love

look here.
shhh! listen, now.
all pasts and all futures—
all time exists right here—right now
this vast, eternal, ever-changing now.
Breathe in, breathe out—our heart whispers,
“Everything’s connected!”
Now, let breath go
look here.

8 comments:

Bonnie, Original Art Studio said...

How moving Dan. Makes me think of Stephen Levine and his spare, meaningful words to fragile beings near death in hospices. Such profound connections can be made when we are truly present in the moment and to the other.

Dan Gurney said...

Bonnie, ~sigh~ thank you.

Jenny Stevning said...

Stunning! So Soulful.

Dan Gurney said...

Jenny, thanks.

Delwyn said...

Dan

I loved the visual that the poem creates as it matches the in breath, the hold at the top, and then the outbreath...the emptying...

well done...

I will try the format. I have a few tankas awaiting a post one day...

You were very lucky to have such teachers, you talk of in today's post. I wonder how the Japanese aesthetic changed Buddhism...


Happy days

Jim714 said...

Dan, this is wonderful.

Thanks,

Jim

Dan Gurney said...

Hi, Delwyn-- Thank you! I love trying out different forms of poetry. I favor the syllabic forms of poetry that Jim Wilson discusses in his blog, Shaping Words. Syllabic forms offer just enough form to encourage poetic expression but with plenty of freedom too.

Your question about how Japanese culture flavored Buddhism is interesting. It actually took me a long time to discern what was Buddhist and what was Japanese in my early days with Kobun. I conflated them. Subsequent teachers helped me understand more clearly.

Dan Gurney said...

JIm, thank you! I'd love to see a rictameter on your blog.