Saturday, October 30, 2010

Gentle Roots

I joined a Sebastopol Walk today with about twenty of our friendly community townsfolk. We ambled around town under a dark gray late October sky all morning looking at and learning about notable trees in our town. We saw many venerable trees. It was led by Geoffrey Skinner, his wife and fellow walkers who chipped in their knowledge.

We've all seen sidewalks lifted and buckled by roots growing under them. We might think that all trees aggressively grab the earth. But that's not so.

Lynn Deedler explained to us that the Coastal Redwood, Sequoia Sempervirens, has a gentle (but very long-lasting) grasp on earth.

We looked at the base of this Coastal Redwood tree.

It has grown gently around the concrete curb that was poured too near its feet.



For more information about the tall, wise, and long-lived Coastal Redwoods visit Here.

6 comments:

Jinksy said...

And how like a huge foot that tree trunk looks...

steven said...

dan what a photograph! among other things, i admire trees for their patience. i also wonder at the thinking of people who find their growing bodies an intrusion into human life. with trees it's necessary to think very long time and not so much short time. to think about their needs ten, fifty, even a hundred or hundreds of years from now. boy what we could learn if we thought like that about all of nature!!! steven

Dan Gurney said...

Hi, Jinksy, thanks for stopping by and leaving a comment. Yes, it's like a foot, but a foot not meant to walk with, just a foot to stand on. I love the way trees are so committed to their place on earth. I find it inspiring, really.

Dan Gurney said...

steven, I'm with you. I find myself entirely enthralled with trees and all they have to teach me. Like I said to Jinksy, I admire their commitment to place. As you say, their long view. The tree in this photo might live 2,000 years, or about 33 times as long as I have lived.

A tree like this has time to think things over and come to deeper understandings than we tend to do. They can tell us a lot if we have the patience to listen.

Ruth said...

There is something very stirring and tender in this post that touches me. It's the tree. And it's you for the way you simply posted its profundity, so simply.

Dan Gurney said...

Thank, you, Ruth. The trees gentleness really impressed me. I hope many others are touched as well.